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Approaching Transition

Posted March 1, 2014

Welcome to our weekly blog series! Each month we feature one of our amazing Bread and Yoga teachers sharing their thoughts or teachings from their class with you and our community. Today’s post is the final post from February’s blogger and Hatha/Vinyasa teacher Rian Bodner. Check back next Saturday for a new post from Amy Soucy!

 

We are on the verge of the transition of seasons & it’s good time to look at the transitions in our practice as it relates to our lives.

How we enter and exit a posture or situation isn’t seperate from the pose or event, we actually carry all of that information into it. Just like if you were to begin a roadtrip with the steering wheel tilted to the right, the rear view mirror too high, staring at your iphone, you wouldn’t get past the end of the block.

Approaching without that attention is sort of like moving in too fast for a kiss on a first date;
you could wind up with your tongue in someone’s ear.

One of the most challenging and repeated sequences of a yoga practice is the vinyasa. The linking of plank-chaturanga-upward facing dog-downward facing dog. It’s done consistently throughout most yoga classes. If done incorrectly with repetition it can be the cause of many an injury. And more than just our body’s potential for the postures themselves, it’s how we link them together that co-creates each pose. It’s also easy to forget that chaturanga is not just a transition but an actual posture, one which is imbued with moment of conciousness that prepares us for what’s to come. If we just skim past this moment without thoughtful consideration, we prevent ourselves from experiencing the heart opening which blossoms as a result of our attention. (Upward facing dog). Approaching without that attention is sort of like moving in too fast for a kiss on a first date; you could wind up with your tongue in someone’s ear. And just like that person is unlikely to call you for a repeat, your shoulders feel similarly.

By looking for consciousness, and consideration of everywhere we place our bodies we shift the question from what? to how?

 

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